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Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist

Senior lecturer

Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist
Senior lecturer
annelie.sjolander-lindqvist@gu.se
+46 31 786 5165

Room number: 103
Postal Address: Box 603, 40530 Göteborg
Visiting Address: Övre Fogelbergsgatan 6 , 41128 Göteborg
Duties: Research


School of Global Studies (More Information)
Box 700
405 30 Göteborg
www.globalstudies.gu.se
globalstudies@gu.se
Visiting Address: Konstepidemins väg 2 , 413 14 Göteborg

About Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist

  • Ph D in Human Ecology (Lund University).
  • Researcher at the Gothenburg Research Institute, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg
  • Researcher and teacher at the School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg (on leave).

www.academia.edu

www.researchgate.net

Areas of interest

My main research interests concerns broadly environmental anthropology with particular focus on the management of natural and cultural heritage resources, including large carnivores, water resources, place and landscape. Ares of interest addresses urban and rural land use, citizen involvement in natural and cultural management, the interface between local identity, science and politics in environmental contestation, local concerns and values at stake, and contestations regarding the implementation of environmental policies.

Current research
 

Environmental Collaborative Governance in Large Carnivore Management: Policy and Institutional Design, Administrative Leadership and Stakeholders

2015-2018. Financed by the Swedish Research Council.

Project Leader.

Managing the complex socio-ecological conflicts over the presence of large carnivores and disagreement about the burdens and benefits of conservation initiatives without destroying neither wildlife nor human viability and welfare, requires a delicate balance between local concerns for rural communities’ survival and property vulnerability alongside with international concerns for saving threatened species. Environmental collaborative governance, mostly in terms of decentralization and inclusion of stakeholders, has therefore increasingly become advocated as a useful way of handling conflicting goals, balancing different interests and reconciling local concerns without compromising wildlife population viability.

Previous research has pointed out that the legitimacy of collaborative governance depends on several factors, including: i) the institutional design to ensure the inclusion of relevant stakeholders, ii) facilitative leadership to set and maintain clear ground rules, building trust, facilitating dialogue, and exploring mutual gains and finally, and iii) the stakeholders’ ideas and conceptualizations of participation, including the social and cultural context informing the participants’ understandings of the governance model. However, how those factors should be successfully integrated in collaborative processes remains still unclear.

Through comparing four cases of environmental collaborative governance that have been initiated to promote large carnivore recovery amidst many human land uses, the research project aims to synthesize and advance knowledge on the challenges, incentives for and constraints on collaborative governance and the building of legitimacy.

The project focuses on Norway, Finland, Sweden and Michigan in the western Great Lake region. Through different governance paths these countries have adopted collaborative measures by building large carnivore committees to increase and improve legitimacy in decision-making. By combining expertise from three disciplines – political science, public administration and social anthropology – this research project will:

-  Compare policies and institutional design to explore each model’s capacity to find a balance between different interests and demands;

- Compare the role of administrative leadership in moving the collaboration process forward focusing on how public managers responsible for the implementation of the large carnivore policy solve the tension between multiple tasks, different rules and conflicting interests;

- Compare how different stakeholders and communities of interest and practice perceive, conceptualize and understand their participation in decentralized large carnivore management, and analyze the contextual and implicit framings in terms of selections, attributions of meaning, and normativity.

The research methods include narrative methodology, participant observation at meetings and document analysis.

GOVERNANCE: HUMAN RESPONSES TO
MULTI-SPECIES MANAGEMENT

2015-2017. Financed by the Wildlife Management Fund.

It is widely acknowledged that human individual and collective dimensions are as influential as the biophysical environment for effective wildlife governance. These dimensions consist of interrelated individual, socio-cultural, and political-institutional responses to changes in the biophysical environment. Such human responses need to be understood and applied to wildlife governance and management in both the near and more distant future. Our overarching objectives in GOVERNANCE are to; (1) Analyze – individual and collective responses - to wildlife governance and management at multiple levels, (2) Assess the capacity for multi-species management by synthesizing individual and collective responses to future challenges of wildlife governance, (3) Offer support to the design of future multi-species wildlife management, and (4) Integrate natural and social science to build future capacity for Swedish Ungulate Multi-species Management.GOVERNANCE will closely collaborate with the research program BEYOND MOOSE and auxiliary projects. To facilitate this collaboration we developed the overarching platform WildSAMM (www.wildsamm.weebly.com). WildSAMM generates and provides a knowledge base for sustainable management of multi-species ungulate systems, with accepted trade-offs between ecosystem services and acceptable levels of conflict among stakeholders.

GASTROCERT - Gastronomy and Creative Entrepreneurship in Rural Tourism

2015-2017. Financed through the Joint Programming Initiative "Cultural Heritage".

Project Leader.

Sustainable landscape management in rural areas requires the creation of opportunities that treat landscapes in the context of their historical, cultural and social factors. The growing popularity of gastronomy efforts, as part of broader sustainable tourism development strategies, calls for study of the dynamics between ‘heritage’, ‘tourism’ and ‘creative entrepreneurship’.

This project has two aims, to explore (i) how the development of local gastronomy can help to protect rural heritage values; and (ii) how entrepreneurial culture can enhance locally produced food as a value-added touristic experience.

The objectives include understanding the important role that food plays in cultural identities and promotion of local and regional traditions. The project also emphasizes the significance of local knowledge, skills and practices regarding heritage assets and how experiential journeys through cultural landscapes promote gastronomic tourism.

In terms of complementing the aims of the Heritage Plus call, the project will entail high-quality, interdisciplinary and collaborative research that will enhance our understanding of the vitally important role that food plays in cultural identities and the appreciation and promotion of local and regional traditions. Gastronomic heritages - and the associated issues of rural and regional development - are truly interdisciplinary subjects that require appreciation of history, art, landscapes, environmental conservation and social structures.

This project is designed to produce the following outcomes, which includes the direct transfer of study findings to SME’s and policymakers:

◾Reports on how local markets can be used to preserve and sustain local producers, while maintaining local identity.
◾A blueprint for the development of regional gastronomic initiatives that involve SMEs, public bodies and destination marketing organisations.
◾A toolkit on how SMEs can communicate the importance of landscapes and traditions through ‘narratives’.
◾Results synthesised into appropriate documentation and presented to policymakers, to develop a better understanding of how gastro-tourism can contribute to economic development and increased understanding and preservation of gastronomic cultural heritage.

Four case studies in four countries located in northern Europe and the Mediterranean region are included in the project.

The project consortium offers a balanced and interdisciplinary partnership of research institutions in northern European and the Mediterranean region that will offer contrasting yet complementary cultures, experience, expertise and perspectives with respect to regional development. This will encourage a fascinating and rich interflow of ideas between partners, with value both within the project and the knowledge transfer to businesses and public-sector organizations in the different countries that are included in the project. The partnership is heavily interdisciplinary in nature, as not only do the five partners each represent a different country and gastronomic traditions, but each one also has different areas of expertise that is of outstanding value for the implementation of the project.

Risk Communication by Swedish Government Agencies: A Comparative Approach

2015-2017. Financed by the Swedish Research Council Formas.

In policy for sustainable development, potential future hazards must be addressed by a variety of government agencies at
national, county and municipal level. Information about risks identified and assessed must further be disseminated to the public and to societal actors concerned. Risk communication is therefore an integral part of government agencies' resonsibility.

The project aims to analyze and compare the organizational conditions for risk communication at agency level. Risk Communication undertaken by seven Swedish sectorial governmental agencies, engaged in planning in different areas of society, namely environmental protection, transportation, energy, chemicals, food, housing and building, and contingency planning, will be systematically explored to answer how government agencies on a national Swedish level communicate about risk to other authorities, the media, stakeholders, and the public.

Interviews and study of steering documents will be used to uncover organizational dimensions influencing risk communication at agency level. By means of qualitative content analysis methods diverse outcomes of risk communication, including web pages, press releases, reports, brochures, and social media, will be compared and analyzed according to content, structure, and communicative assumptions.

Ecological Entrepreneurship in Urban Space: A Study of Urban Gardening and Farming and Sustainable Development

2015. The Adlerbertska Research Foundation.

In search for sustainability in urban space, innovation and non-conventional cultivation methods and business models have come to play an important part of sustainable development efforts. Such efforts require the creation of opportunities that treat urban and semi-urban space in the context of their historical, cultural, social and ecological factors as well as greater collaboration between producers, consumers and policy makers. This pilot project takes departure in the concept of ‘ecological entrepreneurship’ and will explore initiatives for local food production in and around the cities of Gothenburg and New York. 
 

Reconciling Environmental Interests: Natural and Cultural Heritage in River Restoration

2009-2013. This crossdisciplinary project, funded by the Swedish National Heritage Board and Formas, examined how two sets of environmental interests, biodiversity protection and cultural heritage conservation, may be reconciled in Swedish river restoration. Such restoration is prescribed by the state as a requirement for the fulfilment of the Environmental Quality Objective Flourishing Lakes and Streams. River restoration involves opposing interests since generally, what nature conservationists wish to remove from watercourses, heritage professionals wish to protect. The main objective is to study how such diverging interests are construed, understood and negotiated by authorities, local residents and other stakeholders, and to identify and analyse factors that may facilitate or hinder co-ordination, collaboration and local participation.

Innovative Management Strategies: Integrating National Predator Policy Locally

2009-2012. The project investigated whether management strategies intended to extend public involvement – suggested as necessary steps to take in order to raise the public’s trust for political decision-making and administrative policy implementation – indeed contributes to increased communication and dialogue, and reduced distance between concerned local residents, communities of interest and decision-makers.

Communication in the Implementation of Predator Protection Policy: Encounters between users and decision-maker. 

2009-2013. The Project was funded by the Research Council FORMAS and addressed the issue of communication in contested resource use by investigating the meetings and interactions between stakeholders and regional/national authorities that take place via the implementation of damage preventive measures and the control of damage on private property caused by protected wildlife.

Teaching and tutoring
Governance and Regulation in Cultural Heritage

Sustainable Development

Latest publications

Shaking Hands: Balancing Tensions in the Swedish Forested Landscape
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström
Conservation and Society, Journal article 2019
Journal article

Craft beer – building social terroir through connecting people, place and business
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Wilhelm Skoglund, Daniel Laven
Journal of Place Management and Development, Journal article 2019
Journal article

Research amidst the contentious issue of wolf presence: Exploration of reference frames and social, cultural, and political dimensions
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Anna Bendz, Serena Cinque, Camilla Sandström
Large Carnivore Conservation and Management: Human Dimensions, Edited by Tasos Hovardas, Abingdon, Oxon, Routledge, Chapter in book 2018
Chapter in book

Gastronomy Tourism: An Interdisciplinary Literature Review of Research Areas, Disciplines, and Dynamics
Anna De Jong, Monica Palladino, Roma Garrido Puig, Guiseppa Romeo, Nadia Fava et al.
Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Journal article 2018
Journal article

Between politics and management: Governing large carnivores in Fennoscandia
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström, Jani Pellika, Juha Hiedanpää, Olve Krange et al.
Large Carnivore Conservation and Management: Human Dimensions, Edited by Tasos Hovardas,, London, Routledge, Chapter in book 2018
Chapter in book

Governing Large Carnivores - Comparative Insights from Three Different Countries
Katarina Hansson-Forman, Elsa Reimerson, Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström
Society and Natural Resources, Journal article 2018
Journal article

Don't forget to look down – collaborative approaches to predator conservation
Steve M. Redpath, John D. C. Linnell, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Luigi Boitani, Nils Brunnefeld et al.
Biological Reviews, Journal article 2017
Journal article

In the Eye of the Beholder: On Using Photography in Research on Sustainability
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Petra Adolfsson
The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context, Journal article 2015
Journal article

Showing 1 - 10 of 37

2019

Shaking Hands: Balancing Tensions in the Swedish Forested Landscape
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström
Conservation and Society, Journal article 2019
Journal article

Craft beer – building social terroir through connecting people, place and business
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Wilhelm Skoglund, Daniel Laven
Journal of Place Management and Development, Journal article 2019
Journal article

2018

Research amidst the contentious issue of wolf presence: Exploration of reference frames and social, cultural, and political dimensions
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Anna Bendz, Serena Cinque, Camilla Sandström
Large Carnivore Conservation and Management: Human Dimensions, Edited by Tasos Hovardas, Abingdon, Oxon, Routledge, Chapter in book 2018
Chapter in book

Gastronomy Tourism: An Interdisciplinary Literature Review of Research Areas, Disciplines, and Dynamics
Anna De Jong, Monica Palladino, Roma Garrido Puig, Guiseppa Romeo, Nadia Fava et al.
Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism, Journal article 2018
Journal article

Between politics and management: Governing large carnivores in Fennoscandia
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström, Jani Pellika, Juha Hiedanpää, Olve Krange et al.
Large Carnivore Conservation and Management: Human Dimensions, Edited by Tasos Hovardas,, London, Routledge, Chapter in book 2018
Chapter in book

Governing Large Carnivores - Comparative Insights from Three Different Countries
Katarina Hansson-Forman, Elsa Reimerson, Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström
Society and Natural Resources, Journal article 2018
Journal article

2017

Don't forget to look down – collaborative approaches to predator conservation
Steve M. Redpath, John D. C. Linnell, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Luigi Boitani, Nils Brunnefeld et al.
Biological Reviews, Journal article 2017
Journal article

2015

In the Eye of the Beholder: On Using Photography in Research on Sustainability
Annelie Sjölander Lindqvist, Petra Adolfsson
The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context, Journal article 2015
Journal article

Showing 1 - 10 of 37

Page Manager: Linda Genborg|Last update: 2/25/2014
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